Every Time I Die “From Parts Unknown” Album Review

Every Time I Die

From Parts Unknown

By: Neil Hazel (@iamneilhazel)

6.30.14
Every Time I Die are no strangers to writing fast-paced, in-your-face metal, and with their seventh full length “From Parts Unknown” the Buffalo, New York group manageevery time covers to innovate while staying true to their roots. The first track “The Great Secret” sets a pace for an album that is full of relentlessly pounding drums, and hard-hitting riffs. Vocalist Keith Buckley seamlessly floats from guttural screams, to soulful singing. The album moves at a brisk pace, with every track guaranteed to have you banging your head along with guitarists Andy Williams and Jordan Buckley’s grizzly riffs and chords. Bassist Stephen Micciche is constantly on point, filling out the tracks with a solid, heavy bass tone and drummer Ryan Leger doesn’t let up for a second over the 12-track album.

After one of the quickest and most ruthless tracks “If There Is Room To Move, Things Move”, Every Time I Die slows things down, but it is no less entertaining. “Moor” begins with a tense, eerie piano piece accompanied by Buckley’s haunting vocals. The track slowly builds up, moving like a train heading towards an inevitable crash. When the drums and guitar hit, it is one of the most satisfyingly heavy songs on the album. With the track “Old Light”, The Gaslight Anthem’s Brian Fallon is recruited to sing the catchy, head nodding chorus. His vocals fit perfectly in between the growls and roars of Buckley during the verses. The album is closed out by the viscous track “Idiot”, leaving the listener both exhausted and wanting more.

From Parts Unknown harkens back to Every Time I Die’s early releases like Hot Damn! and Last Night in Town, and with that has cemented itself as one of Every Time I Die’s most aggressive releases to date. The group did not forget the country elements that they’ve incorporated into their more recent albums. Just like Buckley’s vocals, the guitars and drums move in between thrash and country from second to second. It seems that Every Time I Die has found a sweet spot in between the old and the new and leaves something that every metal fan can find to enjoy. From punk, to thrash, southern to metalcore, From Parts Unknown clearly shows that after seven releases, Every Time I Die is not slowing down any time soon.


 

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